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StemSave Blog

Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cells Treatment

Posted by pamela@stemsave.com on Oct 16, 2018 1:43:00 PM

A case study utilizing a patient’s own stem cells to treat rheumatoid arthritis demonstrated a drastic decrease in joint pain and inflammation. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) occurs when the immune system incorrectly attacks the body’s tissues, eventually leading to joint deformities, bone erosion and intense pain due to the breakdown of the lining of the joint. Typical treatments for RA involve anti-inflammatory medications, or surgery to repair the joints. However, both types of treatments involve severe side effects and are not guaranteed to work. The stem cell treatment sighted in the case study holds the potential to radically upend current practices and create a new standard of care for this widespread disorder.

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Topics: Rheumatoid Arthritis, autologous stem cells, stem cell therapy, arthritis treatment, mesenchymal stem cells, autoimmune disease

Stem Cells Used to Repair Cleft Palates in Children

Posted by hunter@stemsave.com on Sep 21, 2018 1:15:00 PM

Researchers at Hospital De San Jose in Colombia have utilized autologous (the patients’ own) stem cells to regenerate bone in children with cleft palates, greatly improving their quality of life by replacing an often arduous, surgically invasive procedure with a stem cell graft.The children partaking in the study were born with cleft palates, which typically require surgery and extensive grafting with bone from elsewhere in the body to create enough bone matter to support future teeth. When the children were born, their parents made the wise decision to bank their children’s powerful cord blood stem cells, which became vital to the success of this later treatment. This groundbreaking study used the patients’ own stem cells and a biological scaffold to allow the stem cells to grow into bone and fill the cleft. The ability to use autologous stem cells posed no risk of rejection to the patients, and in 5 and 10-year follow ups, the patients showed healthy bone development and experienced no adverse effects.

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Topics: cleft palate repair, stem cell graft, investing in future health, stem cell banking, regenerative medicine, bone regeneration, autologous stem cells

Stem Cells Reverse MS in Breakthrough Clinical Trial

Posted by taylor@stemsave.com on Dec 1, 2017 12:30:00 PM

A team of researchers at the Hadassah Medical Center in Israel has developed a unique method of applying a patient’s own stem cells to restore mobility following progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). MS is an autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks its own neurons and affects millions of people worldwide. Severely progressive MS leads to complete loss of limb function, memory problems, seizures, and even systemic organ failure. This groundbreaking, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial successfully administered autologous (the patient’s own) mesenchymal stem cells, which were cultured and expanded to clinically significant numbers, and then applied directly into the spinal fluid. The treatment simultaneously addressed the two problems of MS - inflammatory immune response and the destruction of the outer coating of neurons that allows for quick signal transduction thereby engendering a significant increase in efficacy.

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Topics: MS, multiple sclerosis, multiple sclerosis treatment, autologous stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, patient's own mesenchymal stem cells

Stem Cells Reverse Paraplegia

Posted by devin@stemsave.com on Nov 29, 2017 4:45:00 PM

Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute have directed stem cells to differentiate into neurons with the potential to repair spinal damage that causes paralysis in the legs, known as paraplegia. In an animal model, subjects suffering injury to their spinal cords, causing them to lose all mobility and feeling in their hind limbs, were treated with human stem cells cultured to differentiate into support factors that promote neural growth and survival. Three weeks after administering the stem cell treatment, 42% of the subjects began either walking or showing significant improvements in bearing weight on their hind legs. Furthermore, over 75% of the subjects responded to stimulation in their hind legs. When compared to the placebo group that received no stem cells, the results were impressive and demonstrate  the immense potential of utilizing stem cells to restore the neural connections in the spine following a traumatic injury.

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Topics: paraplegia, quadriplegia, stem cell paralysis treatment, adult stem cells, autologous stem cells, regenerative medicine, Paralysis

Stem Cell Skin Grafts Save Terminally Ill Child

Posted by artgreco@stemsave.com on Nov 22, 2017 4:45:00 PM

A collaborative effort from German and Italian researchers allowed a child dying from severe epidermolysis bullosa (EB) to lead a healthy, normal life. EB is a genetic disorder which causes the top layer of the skin (epidermis) to become extremely fragile and easily blister-prone. Patients with EB typically do not live past the age of 30, given the exorbitant risk of infections and other complications of having “paper thin” skin, and there is currently no cure. However, a recent experimental skin graft, made from the patient’s own stem cells, allowed a young boy to return to normalcy. The graft’s success comes from a technique of genetic engineering to correct the defective gene that causes EB in immature stem cells, and then develops those stem cells into layers of epithelial tissue and applies them to the patient’s affected areas. Though the risk of such procedures is high, using the patient’s own cells minimizes the risk of rejection and provides a safer alternative to merely enduring this disease.

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Topics: epidermolysis bullosa, stem cell skin graft, regenerative medicine, autologous stem cells

Diabetic-PAD Symptom Relief with Stem Cells

Posted by devin@stemsave.com on Nov 8, 2017 4:45:00 PM

A study at the University of Illinois found that stem cell injections can promote angiogenesis, or blood vessel generation, which improves the circulation problems associated with diabetes. The condition in question is peripheral artery disease or PAD, in which patients suffer from restricted blood flow caused by plaque on the walls of the arteries; most typically in the leg. This is due in part to poor circulation in diabetic patients which can cause moderate to severe pain during any movement of the leg. It can also lead to ulcers, sores and, in severe cases, gangrene, which can lead to amputation. In an animal model, stem cell injections were shown to improve blood flow and circulation in problematic areas. They also altered the gene expression of surrounding cells to reduce inflammation, which typically exacerbates the problem. PAD currently lacks effective treatments options and is difficult to diagnose until it has progressed severely hence, the study points to a potential breakthrough therapy that utilizes the patient’s own stem cells.

 

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Topics: diabetic wounds, PAD, autologous stem cells, stem cell treatments, regenerative medicine, diabetic treatment

Growing Functional Organs with Stem Cells

Posted by pamela@stemsave.com on Nov 1, 2017 4:45:00 PM

Researchers at Harvard Medical School have utilized stem cells to grow a functional small intestine in a lab. Using human stem cells, the researchers were able to differentiate them into intestinal cells and induced them to form a fully functional intestinal tissue. Previous studies have been successful at growing miniscule segments of the organ, but this innovative study has homed in on a method for compiling smaller, stem cell-derived tissue into an organoid that could soon be available to use in transplants as replacement for damaged organs. Patients who suffer from gastrointestinal tract ailments could benefit from this, in addition to patients who have had portions of their digestive tracts removed due to cancer.

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Topics: regenerative medicine, lab grown organs, autologous stem cells, stem cell treatments

Stem Cell Wound Treatment Enters Phase II Clinical Trials

Posted by taylor@stemsave.com on Oct 19, 2017 5:00:00 PM

Sanford Health is heading into the second phase of clinical trials involving autologous (the patient’s own) stem cells to treat non-healing wounds and ulcers on the body. The trial will be recruiting patients 18 and older to continue testing the efficacy of stem cells in treating wounds that would not heal due to a person’s preexisting conditions. People with weakened immune systems could also benefit from this treatment, given that it would prevent the enormous risk of infection that non-healing wounds pose. Additionally, the treatment could even be applied to heal wounds from surgeries, expediting recovery time dramatically.

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Topics: autologous stem cells, non-healing wounds, diabetic wounds, leg ulcers, stem cell treatments, regenerative medicine

Investing In Your Future Health With Stem Cells

Posted by davids@stemsave.com on Sep 20, 2017 2:15:00 PM

The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute has recently invested $11.6 million into stem cell based regenerative research being conducted at the Temple University School of Medicine. Given the increased incidence of heart disease in recent years, stem cell based treatments are emerging as an optimal method of treatment, though there are still a few hurdles these treatments must overcome in order to be at their optimal effectiveness. Many of the challenges with current stem cell treatments for heart disease are due to the age of the patients and their age-related ailments. Obtaining stem cells for treatment at an older age reduces the stem cells’ efficacy - compared to younger cells, and also impacts the yield; often resulting in an insufficient number of cells for treatment.

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Topics: regenerative medicine, investing in future health, stem cell efficacy, autologous stem cells

Hip Fracture Rehabilitation with Stem Cells

Posted by davids@stemsave.com on Aug 28, 2017 4:45:00 PM

Collaborating researchers from the University of California Davis Medical Center and the Second Xiangya Hospital of the Central-South University (Hunan, China)  are developing an autologous [the patient’s own] stem cell protocol to aid the rehabilitation process following a hip fracture.  With over 300,000 hip fractures in the US alone, and with many patients failing to return to an independent lifestyle following the fracture, the need for more effective rehabilitation methodologies is great; the mortality rate following a fracture is high as well. The team of researchers is focusing on the application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to facilitate the healing process and get patients back on their feet. When tested in an animal model, autologous MSCs were engineered to express a growth factor called bFGF, which directs the differentiation of these stem cells into osteoblasts that will later become bone. When injected back into the subject with a hip fracture, this growth factor also successfully promoted vascularization around the fracture site and the ossification of the bone.

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Topics: hip fractures, regenerative medicine, mesenchymal stem cells, autologous stem cells

AAOMS

AAOMS - American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

 

As the industry leader, StemSave is the only stem cell banking service to be designated as an ASI approved program.

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