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Stem Cells Used to Repair Cleft Palates in Children

Posted by hunter@stemsave.com on Sep 21, 2018 1:15:00 PM

Researchers at Hospital De San Jose in Colombia have utilized autologous (the patients’ own) stem cells to regenerate bone in children with cleft palates, greatly improving their quality of life by replacing an often arduous, surgically invasive procedure with a stem cell graft.The children partaking in the study were born with cleft palates, which typically require surgery and extensive grafting with bone from elsewhere in the body to create enough bone matter to support future teeth. When the children were born, their parents made the wise decision to bank their children’s powerful cord blood stem cells, which became vital to the success of this later treatment. This groundbreaking study used the patients’ own stem cells and a biological scaffold to allow the stem cells to grow into bone and fill the cleft. The ability to use autologous stem cells posed no risk of rejection to the patients, and in 5 and 10-year follow ups, the patients showed healthy bone development and experienced no adverse effects.

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Topics: cleft palate repair, stem cell graft, investing in future health, stem cell banking, regenerative medicine, bone regeneration, autologous stem cells

Stem Cells Bone Up

Posted by barb@stemsave.com on Jun 28, 2018 2:45:00 PM

Bone grafts help millions of people suffering from bone loss due to trauma or disease. Typically, traumatic bone injuries and bone loss due to disease have been mended with synthetic grafts or segments of bone taken from another area in the patient’s body. However, these treatments do not last long-term in growing bodies, and lack vasculature required for mature bone growth. In vitro tests at the New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute of a new technology called Segmental Additive Tissue Engineering (SATE) have demonstrated stem cell grown segments of bone creating large scale, personalized grafts. The SATE protocol seeds the patient’s own stem cells into a scaffold and directs the cells to develop into customized and vascularized bone segments, which pose virtually no risk of rejection, and are able to grow with the patient.

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Topics: bone regeneration, bone regrowth, bone repair, stem cell graft

Stem Cell Graft Receives FDA Approval

Posted by pamela@stemsave.com on Jan 29, 2018 11:58:31 AM

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The FDA has approved a novel synthetic scaffold that would allow stem cells to regrow bone more efficiently. The proprietary technology, Osteo-P [from Molecular Matrix Inc.], replaces the use of bone grafts and utilizes the patient’s own stem cells to regrow bone following trauma or injury. The Osteo-P, a scaffold made of carbohydrate [sugar] polymer, is an improved alternative to current bone grafting procedures in that it enables the body’s own stem cells to regenerate bone in aggregate, and it is resorbed by the body as it is replaced by the newly formed bone.

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Topics: stem cell graft, FDA approval, bone regeneration

Dental Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration - Clinical Trial Underway

Posted by taylor@stemsave.com on Oct 10, 2017 4:45:00 PM

The team at Central Hospital in Nancy, France is conducting research utilizing dental stem cells to regrow and restore bone density. The trial aims to direct dental mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into engineered osteoblasts, as well as promoting angiogenesis, which is necessary given that bones typically lack sufficient vascularization to make efficient repairs. The benefit of using autologous [the patient’s own] stem cells makes this an effective treatment option that does not pose a risk of rejection. By directing stem cells to promote bone mineralization and endothelial growth, as well as creating vascularization to promote healing, stem cells can be applied to a variety of bone trauma and deficiencies.

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Topics: mesenchymal stem cells, bank dental stem cells, dental stem cell use, regenerative medicine, bone regeneration

Bone-afide Stem Cells

Posted by taylor@stemsave.com on Sep 29, 2017 4:45:00 PM

Researchers at University of Glasgow have developed a new “nanokicking” technology, which directs mesenchymal stem cells to precisely differentiate into a bone material for use in fracture repairs and bone grafting. By subjecting the stem cells to ‘nanokicking’ – precise, nanoscale vibrations, while the cells are in a collagen gel, these cells can more effectively transform into bone cells capable of replenishing damaged or depleted bone mass. Current bone grafts obtained from patients themselves nearly never yield enough bone material to be clinically relevant for severe injuries, and donor bone grafts have a high risk of rejection hence, autologous stem cell grafts represent an optimal treatment option for patients suffering from any type of bone trauma or deficiency. With bone being the second most grafted tissue [behind blood], ‘nanokicking’ the patient’s own stem cells would significantly impact patient outcomes following reconstructive, maxillofacial and orthopedic surgeries.

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Topics: bone grafting, mesenchymal stem cells, regenrative medicine, bone density, bone regeneration

TMJ Repair Made With Autologous Stem Cells

Posted by artgreco@stemsave.com on Oct 13, 2016 3:51:20 PM

Dr. Mildred C. Embree and her team at the Columbia College of Dental Medicine have discovered stem cells that can facilitate the growth of cartilage and repair damaged joints. The fibrocartilage found in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the jaw bone does not readily regrow or heal itself – hence, researchers worked to manipulate the stem cells that reside in the TMJ to regenerate cartilage and repair the joint.

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Topics: autologous stem cells, TMJ repair, cartilage regeneration, bone regeneration, fibrocartilage

Bioprinting a New Jaw

Posted by hunter@stemsave.com on May 12, 2016 1:26:28 PM

An Australian periodontist has pioneered a new 3D printing technique that regrows missing gum tissue and jaw bones. Traditionally, bone and tissue replacements are taken from other parts of the body such as the hip or femur. Dr. Ivanovki’s method uses a bioprinter to grow missing tissue from a patient's own cells. This 3D printing alternative is much less invasive than bone replacement, and dramatically reduces the risk of infection or rejection.

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Topics: bioprinting, stemsaveblog, 3D Printing, bone regeneration, Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering, jawbone, mesenchymal stem cells

Under Pressure – Stem Cell Differentiation Triggered by Mechanical Force.

Posted by pamela@stemsave.com on Apr 2, 2015 11:12:16 AM

Bioengineers from the University of California, San Diego, have identified a mechanism by which stem cell differentiation is regulated by the exertion of mechanical pressure.  Using optical tweezers to apply mechanical force to stem cells, the researchers, led by Dr. Yingxiao Wang, observed the release of calcium ions, which are critical in the cellular communication required for stem cell differentiation.  Dr. Wang’s team concluded that the forces of a stem cell’s environment, such as the tension inside the jaw, can promote the cell’s maturation into stiff tissue like bone or cartilage.

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Topics: Bone loss, Bone, repair cartilage, bone regeneration, stem cell differentiation, University of California San Diego, mechanical pressure,, pressure, calcium,, stemsaveblog

AAOMS

AAOMS - American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

 

As the industry leader, StemSave is the only stem cell banking service to be designated as an ASI approved program.

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